Blogging · Fashion · Lifestyle

Indian Holiday Series: Diwali

Diwali

Hello my KMD lovelies!

And just like that, we’re in November!  We have less than two months left of this year- less than TWO months!  I just can’t believe.

Also, I know it’s been a while since I’ve written a blog post. I just took an unexpected break from blogging.  I had visited my family in Toronto for most of October and I wanted to spend my time with them.  So, blogging was not my concern while I was there.  And yes, I had a blast in Toronto- for those wondering.

Without further ado, let’s actually get into the topic of this post: Diwali!  This is the second and last part of the Indian Holiday Series that I am collaborating with alongside an amazing blogger babe Vidhi of coffeeVSchai– don’t forget to check her out for more Diwali content and outfit inspiration!  Also, if you haven’t checked out already, don’t forget to check out the first post of this series for the festival of Navaratri.

On to the star of the show:  my Diwali outfit!  Before I get started on describing my outfit, I would like to present a little background and history on the holiday.  Diwali is known as the “Festival of Lights” and it is the most widely celebrated holiday in India and amongst Indians around the globe, of all religions.  It occurs every fall, either in mid-October or mid-November depending on what day it falls on based on the Hindu lunisolar calendar.

While there are many different reasons Diwali is celebrated amongst all the religions in India, I’ll mention just a few.  Hindu’s celebrate Diwali depending on the regions of India they are located in.  However, one of the most widely celebrated reasons for Hindu’s is based on the Hindu legend of Ramayana, where Diwali is the day in which Rama, SitaLakshmana and Hanuman reached Ayodhya after a period in exile.  Also, Rama’s army of good defeated the demon king Ravana’s army of evil.  Jains also observe Diwali in celebration of the liberation of Mahavira, Sikhs celebrate it to mark the release of Guru Hargobind from a Mughal Empire prison also known as Bandi Chhor Divas, Newer Buddhist (not like traditional Buddhists) celebrate it by worshipping the Goddess Lakshmi.

Even though the festival is celebrated amongst all the different religions and regions in India, it is celebrated in the same way.   All individuals celebrate it by doing a deep cleaning of their homes and making decorations on the floor known as rangoli’s as well as, illuminating their homes with diyas, doing a puja, light fireworks, and exchanging gifts and sweets/candy.

Now that the history and context is Diwali has been covered, let’s get onto my outfit I had chosen for this holiday!  For my Diwali outfit, I chose a rather simple yet elegant Anarkali– which is essentially a floor-length gown alongside chuidaar pants (similar to leggings) and a dupatta (a long scarf).  I choose this royal blue colored Anarkali because I love how bold this color is and makes me stand out from a mile away.  This is one of my favorite Anarkali’s that I own.  I love how elegantly it flows from top to bottom.  It has a very minimalist design however, it’s so elegantly designed.  It’s great to wear as Diwali dinner host or the temple.  Last but not least, I paired my outfit with some huge dangly earrings and some gold kitten heels.

What type of outfit would you wear to a Diwali celebration?

Diwali 01
Another shot of my outfit
Diwali 02
A little close-up of my earrings.
Diwali 2018
My hair done by the amazing Denise Chan.

Also, don’t forget to check out the amazing Blogger Babe Vidhi of coffeeVSchai for more outfit inspiration!

Photo credits:  Kunjal Pathak Photography.  Follow him on Instagram, Facebook or E-mail him at kunjalpathak@gmail.com

Make-up and Hair:  Denise Chan

14 thoughts on “Indian Holiday Series: Diwali

  1. This blue on you is just stunning! I think this is your color girl and this was a great pick. Also, such a well written post my friend! I love this collaboration you and Vidhi did and hope you guys do more in the future!

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